Votre recherche : kozyrev

134 résultat(s)

  • Biographie - Yuri Kozyrev - ANG
    4466
    Biographie - Yuri Kozyrev - ANG
    4466
    Biographie - Yuri Kozyrev - ANG

     

  • Les chemins de la révolution - Printemps arabe
    760
    Les chemins de la révolution - Printemps arabe
    Anti-Government Protesters in Bahrain.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    11/08/2016
    760
    11/08/2016
    Les chemins de la révolution - Printemps arabe
    Anti-Government Protesters in Bahrain.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Les chemins de la révolution - Printemps arabe
    779
    Les chemins de la révolution - Printemps arabe
    Libyan rebels near a destroyed Gaddafi tank near Ajdabiyah, March 26, 2011.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    26/03/2016
    779
    26/03/2016
    Les chemins de la révolution - Printemps arabe
    Libyan rebels near a destroyed Gaddafi tank near Ajdabiyah, March 26, 2011.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    832
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    The construction site of the new mall for women next to the old cemetery.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    12/10/2015
    832
    12/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    The construction site of the new mall for women next to the old cemetery.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    825
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Gun Shop
    Kurdish gunsmith Bakhtiar Aziz
    The shop isn’t much more than a basement under Erbil’s central bazaar. Its only fittings are a work bench, a chair and some tools. Shotguns and air rifles line the walls. Bakhtiar Aziz even owns some ancient-looking muskets.
    Before Islamic State swept into Iraq, Bakhtiar’s business mostly focused on repairing hunting weapons. He had run the family business since 1987, when he took over from his father during the reign of Saddam Hussein.
    He now repairs weapons for the Peshmerga and Asayesh — a Kurdish intelligence and security agency — for free. Bakhtiar considers the work to be his contribution to the war effort.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    11/10/2015
    825
    11/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Gun Shop
    Kurdish gunsmith Bakhtiar Aziz
    The shop isn’t much more than a basement under Erbil’s central bazaar. Its only fittings are a work bench, a chair and some tools. Shotguns and air rifles line the walls. Bakhtiar Aziz even owns some ancient-looking muskets.
    Before Islamic State swept into Iraq, Bakhtiar’s business mostly focused on repairing hunting weapons. He had run the family business since 1987, when he took over from his father during the reign of Saddam Hussein.
    He now repairs weapons for the Peshmerga and Asayesh — a Kurdish intelligence and security agency — for free. Bakhtiar considers the work to be his contribution to the war effort.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    824
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    A family of displaced Yazidis from the town of Tel Azer near Sinjar hold up pictures of the male members of their family killed by Isis as they tried to escape to the mountain from the Isis siege in August 2014. "I hid under blankets and heard shooting. I stayed calm and came out and saw everyone, my uncles, father dead. They had been shot in the head, and then I went to the mountain alone," said a young boy from the family left fatherless after witnessing the Isis execution of his older male relatives. The family living in the camp now number 47 people with 9 adults and only one male; Ahmed Naif who is 28. 33 members of the family were kidnapped by Isis, 12 made it back: the ones who have returned are badly traumatized. Jihan and Jilan, 2 teenage girls from the family held by Isis were students in the medical college in Dohuk, committed suicide in Isis captivity. One girl used a piece of bathroom mirror to slit her wrists in the town of Baadge in northwestern Iraq, the family say, after being told she would be 'given' to an Isis leader.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    10/10/2015
    824
    10/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    A family of displaced Yazidis from the town of Tel Azer near Sinjar hold up pictures of the male members of their family killed by Isis as they tried to escape to the mountain from the Isis siege in August 2014. "I hid under blankets and heard shooting. I stayed calm and came out and saw everyone, my uncles, father dead. They had been shot in the head, and then I went to the mountain alone," said a young boy from the family left fatherless after witnessing the Isis execution of his older male relatives. The family living in the camp now number 47 people with 9 adults and only one male; Ahmed Naif who is 28. 33 members of the family were kidnapped by Isis, 12 made it back: the ones who have returned are badly traumatized. Jihan and Jilan, 2 teenage girls from the family held by Isis were students in the medical college in Dohuk, committed suicide in Isis captivity. One girl used a piece of bathroom mirror to slit her wrists in the town of Baadge in northwestern Iraq, the family say, after being told she would be 'given' to an Isis leader.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
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    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kirkuk citadel.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    09/10/2015
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    09/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kirkuk citadel.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
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    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Omar bin Khatab, Kirkuk. Arab men and boys from the Shammar tribe arrange mud bricks that have been drying in the sun to build the walls of their new home. They are from the town of Saad, about 5km away, which was held by Isis from June 2014 until the peshmerga attacked in September 2015, displacing them. They say they are being prevented from returning home so must start building new homes here, on the edge of a barren expanse of land outside the southern borders of Kirkuk city, 9km from the frontline with Isis.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    09/10/2015
    830
    09/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Omar bin Khatab, Kirkuk. Arab men and boys from the Shammar tribe arrange mud bricks that have been drying in the sun to build the walls of their new home. They are from the town of Saad, about 5km away, which was held by Isis from June 2014 until the peshmerga attacked in September 2015, displacing them. They say they are being prevented from returning home so must start building new homes here, on the edge of a barren expanse of land outside the southern borders of Kirkuk city, 9km from the frontline with Isis.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    829
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Sinjar Mountain, Iraqi Kurdistan. A family from the Yazidi minority who were displaced by the Isis capture and murder of their people in August 2014 gather to remember lost family members. The women of the family originally from the town of Tel Qasab, make bread. They live in mud adobe houses with scarce access to water, electricity. The family are mourning the loss of Hassan Haji's cousin Ali who was killed battling Isis in Sinjar city, just below the mountain where they now live, on 29 January 2015. Two weeks later two children from the family were killed in a fire when their heater set alight, injuring their mother whose scars are still visible.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    07/10/2015
    829
    07/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Sinjar Mountain, Iraqi Kurdistan. A family from the Yazidi minority who were displaced by the Isis capture and murder of their people in August 2014 gather to remember lost family members. The women of the family originally from the town of Tel Qasab, make bread. They live in mud adobe houses with scarce access to water, electricity. The family are mourning the loss of Hassan Haji's cousin Ali who was killed battling Isis in Sinjar city, just below the mountain where they now live, on 29 January 2015. Two weeks later two children from the family were killed in a fire when their heater set alight, injuring their mother whose scars are still visible.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    828
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Sinjar Mountain, Iraqi Kurdistan. Displaced Yazidis who escaped from the Isis slaughter of their people and mass enslavement of their women, play on a pool table overlooking the tents of their fellow Yazidis. Thousands of Yazidis, who worship an angel in the form of a peacock and were singled out for acute persecution by Isis in 2014, remain on the mountain. The Yazidi population of around 500,000 people in Iraq are nearly all displaced after Isis took control of Sinjar and surrounding towns, besieging the mountain in the north west of the country.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    07/10/2015
    828
    07/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Sinjar Mountain, Iraqi Kurdistan. Displaced Yazidis who escaped from the Isis slaughter of their people and mass enslavement of their women, play on a pool table overlooking the tents of their fellow Yazidis. Thousands of Yazidis, who worship an angel in the form of a peacock and were singled out for acute persecution by Isis in 2014, remain on the mountain. The Yazidi population of around 500,000 people in Iraq are nearly all displaced after Isis took control of Sinjar and surrounding towns, besieging the mountain in the north west of the country.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    827
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kabarto 2 camp, Iraqi Kurdistan. (NAMES CHANGED) Jwan, 16, her mother Laela, 38 and sister in law Jiyan, 17, members of the Yazidi faith pose for a picture by their tent. Jiyan and Jwan were both held by Isis after the extremist Sunni group attacked Sinjar in August 2014, enslaving thousands of women and killing men from the minority religion. Isis labelled the Yazidis, who worship an angel in the form of a peacock and whose religion shares elements of Christianity, Islam and Zoroastrianism, devil worshipers and singled them out for persecution, rape and murder. Isis believe it is religiously justified to take female Yazidi slaves as spoils of war. The women were captured as they tried to escape towards Sinjar mountain from Sinjar town on August 3rd 2014. Four of Laela's children aged 9,5,4 and 5 months are still being held by Isis. Jiyan was pregnant when she was seized by Isis. She was transferred between Sinjar, Tel Afar, Mosul and finally to Raqqah, Syria by the fighters. She gave birth to a baby boy a year ago during her captivity. She escaped with the help of a smuggler and is now living in a small tent with her family. She says she collapses 3-4 times a week when she remembers her ordeal and her fear that her child would be taken from her. Jwan was taken to Mosul then Syria and then back to Mosul again. She was held as a slave, abused and forced to marry three different Isis fighters. She escaped on 16 November last year by jumping from the second floor window of an Isis fighter's house with two other girls. "When I escaped from that house I didn’t believe I would survive," she said. She is angry after her abuse and is waiting to travel to Germany to receive psychological help on a programme for Yazidi women held captive by Isis.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    06/10/2015
    827
    06/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kabarto 2 camp, Iraqi Kurdistan. (NAMES CHANGED) Jwan, 16, her mother Laela, 38 and sister in law Jiyan, 17, members of the Yazidi faith pose for a picture by their tent. Jiyan and Jwan were both held by Isis after the extremist Sunni group attacked Sinjar in August 2014, enslaving thousands of women and killing men from the minority religion. Isis labelled the Yazidis, who worship an angel in the form of a peacock and whose religion shares elements of Christianity, Islam and Zoroastrianism, devil worshipers and singled them out for persecution, rape and murder. Isis believe it is religiously justified to take female Yazidi slaves as spoils of war. The women were captured as they tried to escape towards Sinjar mountain from Sinjar town on August 3rd 2014. Four of Laela's children aged 9,5,4 and 5 months are still being held by Isis. Jiyan was pregnant when she was seized by Isis. She was transferred between Sinjar, Tel Afar, Mosul and finally to Raqqah, Syria by the fighters. She gave birth to a baby boy a year ago during her captivity. She escaped with the help of a smuggler and is now living in a small tent with her family. She says she collapses 3-4 times a week when she remembers her ordeal and her fear that her child would be taken from her. Jwan was taken to Mosul then Syria and then back to Mosul again. She was held as a slave, abused and forced to marry three different Isis fighters. She escaped on 16 November last year by jumping from the second floor window of an Isis fighter's house with two other girls. "When I escaped from that house I didn’t believe I would survive," she said. She is angry after her abuse and is waiting to travel to Germany to receive psychological help on a programme for Yazidi women held captive by Isis.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    826
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kurdish President Masoud Barzani visit military academy Zakho.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    06/10/2015
    826
    06/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kurdish President Masoud Barzani visit military academy Zakho.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
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    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Baba Gurgur (literally "Father of Fire") is a large oil field near the city of Kirkuk which was the first to be discovered in Northern Iraq in 1927.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    04/10/2015
    871
    04/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Baba Gurgur (literally "Father of Fire") is a large oil field near the city of Kirkuk which was the first to be discovered in Northern Iraq in 1927.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
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    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Rise Foundation works with children to paint murals on the walls of a former prison used by Saddam Hussein.
    The Akre refugee camp in Iraqi Kurdistan – also known as ‘the castle’ – is believed to have once been used as a prison by Saddam Hussein. Today, it is home to some 1,470 Syrian refugees.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    03/10/2015
    870
    03/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Rise Foundation works with children to paint murals on the walls of a former prison used by Saddam Hussein.
    The Akre refugee camp in Iraqi Kurdistan – also known as ‘the castle’ – is believed to have once been used as a prison by Saddam Hussein. Today, it is home to some 1,470 Syrian refugees.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    869
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Peshmerga forces don't allow the Arab families smuggled to the frontline from the villages controlled by ISIS to enter Kurdistan.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    02/10/2015
    869
    02/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Peshmerga forces don't allow the Arab families smuggled to the frontline from the villages controlled by ISIS to enter Kurdistan.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    868
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Erbil, Ainkawa, Iraqi Kurdistan. Shara Kenworthey, 27, from Texas dances with friends at the Bar 52 nightclub popular with expats. The club is on the top floor of a hotel and is also frequented by oil workers. Erbil, which was an oil boom town until a recent financial crisis struck, enjoyed an uptick in nightlife in the last ten years. In October 2015 Christian residents of Ainkawa demonstrated because they were unhappy with the number of clubs and bars in the area.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    02/10/2015
    868
    02/10/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Erbil, Ainkawa, Iraqi Kurdistan. Shara Kenworthey, 27, from Texas dances with friends at the Bar 52 nightclub popular with expats. The club is on the top floor of a hotel and is also frequented by oil workers. Erbil, which was an oil boom town until a recent financial crisis struck, enjoyed an uptick in nightlife in the last ten years. In October 2015 Christian residents of Ainkawa demonstrated because they were unhappy with the number of clubs and bars in the area.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    867
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Peshmerga fighters arrive at Erbil from the frontline.
    Empire World, a private real estate and investment company is seen at the background.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    30/09/2015
    867
    30/09/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Peshmerga fighters arrive at Erbil from the frontline.
    Empire World, a private real estate and investment company is seen at the background.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    866
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Gold market in Erbil.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    30/09/2015
    866
    30/09/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Gold market in Erbil.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    865
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Acting Mayor of Jalawla, a town at the tip of Diyala province, stands in the ruins of his town. His family home was destroyed by Isis and much of the town suffers the damage of the battle to push Isis from Jalawla in late 2014. Despite being free of Isis, the residents of Jalawla aren't allowed back and the town is still strewn with IEDs.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    28/09/2015
    865
    28/09/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Acting Mayor of Jalawla, a town at the tip of Diyala province, stands in the ruins of his town. His family home was destroyed by Isis and much of the town suffers the damage of the battle to push Isis from Jalawla in late 2014. Despite being free of Isis, the residents of Jalawla aren't allowed back and the town is still strewn with IEDs.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    864
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Yazidi families stay in a shack settlement on a patch of land next to the luxurious five-star Divan Hotel, once popular with the overseas business delegations that used to flood to Kurdistan.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    27/09/2015
    864
    27/09/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Yazidi families stay in a shack settlement on a patch of land next to the luxurious five-star Divan Hotel, once popular with the overseas business delegations that used to flood to Kurdistan.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    863
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    The view of the city from the northeastern Goyje Mountain.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    25/09/2015
    863
    25/09/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    The view of the city from the northeastern Goyje Mountain.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    862
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Visitors at Sarchnar Park.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    24/09/2015
    862
    24/09/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Visitors at Sarchnar Park.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    861
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Survivors of the chemical attack and the Anfal campaign in 1988 visit the cemetery.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    21/09/2015
    861
    21/09/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Survivors of the chemical attack and the Anfal campaign in 1988 visit the cemetery.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    860
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    The Rev. Jens Petzold celebrates Mass inside the church of the Maryam al-adhra monastery in Sulaymaniyah.
    Father Jens Petzold has housed more than 150 displaced Christian citizens in his monastery’s church in Iraq, which would normally accommodate just 15 people.
    Father Jens and the community from the monastery in Sulaymaniyah are supporting Christians who have escaped their homes in the Nenewa Plain, near Mosul.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    20/09/2015
    860
    20/09/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    The Rev. Jens Petzold celebrates Mass inside the church of the Maryam al-adhra monastery in Sulaymaniyah.
    Father Jens Petzold has housed more than 150 displaced Christian citizens in his monastery’s church in Iraq, which would normally accommodate just 15 people.
    Father Jens and the community from the monastery in Sulaymaniyah are supporting Christians who have escaped their homes in the Nenewa Plain, near Mosul.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    859
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Lalesh Kurdistan.
    Yazidi shrine at Lalesh.
    Shepherd leds flocks of sheep near lalesh. The gas flare is seen at the background.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    12/05/2015
    859
    12/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Lalesh Kurdistan.
    Yazidi shrine at Lalesh.
    Shepherd leds flocks of sheep near lalesh. The gas flare is seen at the background.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    858
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Lalesh Kurdistan.
    Yazidi shrine at Lalesh.
    General caption: Views of prayer and devotion at the Yazidi shrine at Lalesh, in the mountains outside Erbil. Lalesh is the most sacred place for the Yazidi people, a religious minority mostly found in Kurdish territory. Yazidis are considered heretics by many Muslims, including ISIS insurgents. Since ISIS began its sweep across the region last year, the group has massacred Yazidis in large numbers. While the Kurds tolerate Yazidis, relations aren’t always warm between the two groups. Years of misunderstanding has led many Kurds—and other Muslims—to believe that Yazidis worship the devil, a claim Yazidis vigorously deny.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    12/05/2015
    858
    12/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Lalesh Kurdistan.
    Yazidi shrine at Lalesh.
    General caption: Views of prayer and devotion at the Yazidi shrine at Lalesh, in the mountains outside Erbil. Lalesh is the most sacred place for the Yazidi people, a religious minority mostly found in Kurdish territory. Yazidis are considered heretics by many Muslims, including ISIS insurgents. Since ISIS began its sweep across the region last year, the group has massacred Yazidis in large numbers. While the Kurds tolerate Yazidis, relations aren’t always warm between the two groups. Years of misunderstanding has led many Kurds—and other Muslims—to believe that Yazidis worship the devil, a claim Yazidis vigorously deny.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    857
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Erbil Kurdistan.
    Erbil, the capital of Iraqi Kurdistan
    The citadel is now a Unesco World Heritage site and, while the rest of the city is developing ultra-modern architecture, here an army of workers are restoring the old buildings which were abandoned over the last century as people moved down to the newer areas.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    11/05/2015
    857
    11/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Erbil Kurdistan.
    Erbil, the capital of Iraqi Kurdistan
    The citadel is now a Unesco World Heritage site and, while the rest of the city is developing ultra-modern architecture, here an army of workers are restoring the old buildings which were abandoned over the last century as people moved down to the newer areas.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    856
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Graduation
    Graduation at the American University of Sulaymaniya.
    Young Kurdish women celebrate with their families after graduating from American University of Sulaymaniyah, a four-year school based on the American model of liberal arts education and founded by Barham Salih, former Prime Minister of the KRG. The university attracts students from all over Iraq and the region. ISIS has threatened to attack the school.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    10/05/2015
    856
    10/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Graduation
    Graduation at the American University of Sulaymaniya.
    Young Kurdish women celebrate with their families after graduating from American University of Sulaymaniyah, a four-year school based on the American model of liberal arts education and founded by Barham Salih, former Prime Minister of the KRG. The university attracts students from all over Iraq and the region. ISIS has threatened to attack the school.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    855
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Female Fighters
    Female peshmerga belonging to the PUK train at a base outside Slemani. There are some 500 women in the PUK’s military. Many of them join the force seeking safety from abusive family relationships; others join to defend Kurdistan from ISIS.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    10/05/2015
    855
    10/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Female Fighters
    Female peshmerga belonging to the PUK train at a base outside Slemani. There are some 500 women in the PUK’s military. Many of them join the force seeking safety from abusive family relationships; others join to defend Kurdistan from ISIS.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    854
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Female Fighters
    Female peshmerga belonging to the PUK train at a base outside Slemani. There are some 500 women in the PUK’s military. Many of them join the force seeking safety from abusive family relationships; others join to defend Kurdistan from ISIS.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    10/05/2015
    854
    10/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Female Fighters
    Female peshmerga belonging to the PUK train at a base outside Slemani. There are some 500 women in the PUK’s military. Many of them join the force seeking safety from abusive family relationships; others join to defend Kurdistan from ISIS.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    853
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Female Fighters
    Female peshmerga belonging to the PUK train at a base outside Slemani. There are some 500 women in the PUK’s military. Many of them join the force seeking safety from abusive family relationships; others join to defend Kurdistan from ISIS.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    10/05/2015
    853
    10/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Female Fighters
    Female peshmerga belonging to the PUK train at a base outside Slemani. There are some 500 women in the PUK’s military. Many of them join the force seeking safety from abusive family relationships; others join to defend Kurdistan from ISIS.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    852
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Lake Dukan is a large reservoir north of Slemani that is a hugely popular vacation spot for Kurds—and Arabs. Every weekend during warm weather the lake and the region around it is filled with picnicking families dressed in traditional clothing, tour groups, and students, some of whom spend hours driving along bad roads to reach Dukan.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    08/05/2015
    852
    08/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Lake Dukan is a large reservoir north of Slemani that is a hugely popular vacation spot for Kurds—and Arabs. Every weekend during warm weather the lake and the region around it is filled with picnicking families dressed in traditional clothing, tour groups, and students, some of whom spend hours driving along bad roads to reach Dukan.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    851
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Lake Dukan is a large reservoir north of Slemani that is a hugely popular vacation spot for Kurds—and Arabs. Every weekend during warm weather the lake and the region around it is filled with picnicking families dressed in traditional clothing, tour groups, and students, some of whom spend hours driving along bad roads to reach Dukan.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    08/05/2015
    851
    08/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Lake Dukan is a large reservoir north of Slemani that is a hugely popular vacation spot for Kurds—and Arabs. Every weekend during warm weather the lake and the region around it is filled with picnicking families dressed in traditional clothing, tour groups, and students, some of whom spend hours driving along bad roads to reach Dukan.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
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    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Lake Dukan is a large reservoir north of Slemani that is a hugely popular vacation spot for Kurds—and Arabs. Every weekend during warm weather the lake and the region around it is filled with picnicking families dressed in traditional clothing, tour groups, and students, some of whom spend hours driving along bad roads to reach Dukan.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    08/05/2015
    850
    08/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Lake Dukan is a large reservoir north of Slemani that is a hugely popular vacation spot for Kurds—and Arabs. Every weekend during warm weather the lake and the region around it is filled with picnicking families dressed in traditional clothing, tour groups, and students, some of whom spend hours driving along bad roads to reach Dukan.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

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    849
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Frontline near Mosul Kurdistan.
    Wedding
    General caption: Most Kurds don’t live far from a frontline these days. In the corridor between Mosul and Erbil, a wedding party begins celebration with traditional dancing. The party will likely go on for hours, late into the night, even as airstrikes pound ISIS positions only a few kilometers away.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    07/05/2015
    849
    07/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Frontline near Mosul Kurdistan.
    Wedding
    General caption: Most Kurds don’t live far from a frontline these days. In the corridor between Mosul and Erbil, a wedding party begins celebration with traditional dancing. The party will likely go on for hours, late into the night, even as airstrikes pound ISIS positions only a few kilometers away.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    848
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Frontline near Mosul Kurdistan.
    Wedding
    Most Kurds don’t live far from a frontline these days. In the corridor between Mosul and Erbil, a wedding party begins celebration with traditional dancing. The party will likely go on for hours, late into the night, even as airstrikes pound ISIS positions only a few kilometers away.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    07/05/2015
    848
    07/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Frontline near Mosul Kurdistan.
    Wedding
    Most Kurds don’t live far from a frontline these days. In the corridor between Mosul and Erbil, a wedding party begins celebration with traditional dancing. The party will likely go on for hours, late into the night, even as airstrikes pound ISIS positions only a few kilometers away.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
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    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Men are enjoying the evening at the square, behind them a giant portrait of Mahmud Barzanji, self-declared king of the Kingdom of Kurdistan from 1922–1924.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    05/05/2015
    847
    05/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Slemani Kurdistan.
    Men are enjoying the evening at the square, behind them a giant portrait of Mahmud Barzanji, self-declared king of the Kingdom of Kurdistan from 1922–1924.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    846
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Arbat IDP camp, Slemani.
    Scenes from the Arbat Camp outside Slemani, which houses some 18,000 internally displaced Iraqis. The Kurdish government has provided sanctuary to tens of thousands of people who’ve fled the onslaught of ISIS within Iraq and the civil war in neighboring Syria. Mostly these camps are run by the Kurds, with help from international aid organizations. The Iraqi government has done little to support IDPs.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    04/05/2015
    846
    04/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Arbat IDP camp, Slemani.
    Scenes from the Arbat Camp outside Slemani, which houses some 18,000 internally displaced Iraqis. The Kurdish government has provided sanctuary to tens of thousands of people who’ve fled the onslaught of ISIS within Iraq and the civil war in neighboring Syria. Mostly these camps are run by the Kurds, with help from international aid organizations. The Iraqi government has done little to support IDPs.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    845
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Arbat IDP camp, Slemani.
    Scenes from the Arbat Camp outside Slemani, which houses some 18,000 internally displaced Iraqis. The Kurdish government has provided sanctuary to tens of thousands of people who’ve fled the onslaught of ISIS within Iraq and the civil war in neighboring Syria. Mostly these camps are run by the Kurds, with help from international aid organizations. The Iraqi government has done little to support IDPs.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    04/05/2015
    845
    04/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Arbat IDP camp, Slemani.
    Scenes from the Arbat Camp outside Slemani, which houses some 18,000 internally displaced Iraqis. The Kurdish government has provided sanctuary to tens of thousands of people who’ve fled the onslaught of ISIS within Iraq and the civil war in neighboring Syria. Mostly these camps are run by the Kurds, with help from international aid organizations. The Iraqi government has done little to support IDPs.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    844
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Arbat IDP camp, Slemani.
    Scenes from the Arbat Camp outside Slemani, which houses some 18,000 internally displaced Iraqis. The Kurdish government has provided sanctuary to tens of thousands of people who’ve fled the onslaught of ISIS within Iraq and the civil war in neighboring Syria. Mostly these camps are run by the Kurds, with help from international aid organizations. The Iraqi government has done little to support IDPs.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    04/05/2015
    844
    04/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Arbat IDP camp, Slemani.
    Scenes from the Arbat Camp outside Slemani, which houses some 18,000 internally displaced Iraqis. The Kurdish government has provided sanctuary to tens of thousands of people who’ve fled the onslaught of ISIS within Iraq and the civil war in neighboring Syria. Mostly these camps are run by the Kurds, with help from international aid organizations. The Iraqi government has done little to support IDPs.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    843
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Near the Iranian border, In the mountains west of Slemani.
    A village in the mountains near the Iranian border.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    02/05/2015
    843
    02/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Near the Iranian border, In the mountains west of Slemani.
    A village in the mountains near the Iranian border.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    842
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Near the Iranian border, in the mountains west of Slemani.
    A farmer and his family prepare a field for spring planting in the mountains near the Iranian border.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    02/05/2015
    842
    02/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Near the Iranian border, in the mountains west of Slemani.
    A farmer and his family prepare a field for spring planting in the mountains near the Iranian border.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
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    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    The city of Kirkuk is built around a mound, topped with an abandoned citadel. Below the citadel is a river, clogged with garbage, and markets where traders switch between languages as they barter.
    Turkomans, Sunni and Shia Arabs, and Christians can all be found here and in the surrounding region of dusty plains, low hills, hardscrabble farming communities, and oilfields tapping into a quarter of Iraq's estimated reserves.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    01/05/2015
    841
    01/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    The city of Kirkuk is built around a mound, topped with an abandoned citadel. Below the citadel is a river, clogged with garbage, and markets where traders switch between languages as they barter.
    Turkomans, Sunni and Shia Arabs, and Christians can all be found here and in the surrounding region of dusty plains, low hills, hardscrabble farming communities, and oilfields tapping into a quarter of Iraq's estimated reserves.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
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    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Tekya Talabani (Talabani mosque)
    For more than a century, the Tekya Talabani has provided a spiritual center for the many ethnic groups and faiths of Kirkuk. Built and maintained by the powerful Talabani family, the tekya is one of the few places in the region where performances of traditional Islamic music, dancing, and song are still found. The mosque, and the performances, routinely draw the faithful from all of Kirkuk’s communities—Kurds, Turkmen, and Arabs, Sunni, Shia, and Sufi.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    01/05/2015
    840
    01/05/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Tekya Talabani (Talabani mosque)
    For more than a century, the Tekya Talabani has provided a spiritual center for the many ethnic groups and faiths of Kirkuk. Built and maintained by the powerful Talabani family, the tekya is one of the few places in the region where performances of traditional Islamic music, dancing, and song are still found. The mosque, and the performances, routinely draw the faithful from all of Kirkuk’s communities—Kurds, Turkmen, and Arabs, Sunni, Shia, and Sufi.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    839
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kurdish peshmerga forces on the frontline outside of Kirkuk. In the spring of 2015, Kurdish peshmerga, supported by coalition air power, pushed back against the assault of ISIS insurgents, saving the city of Kirkuk and even reclaiming some ISIS-held villages. By May, the front had mostly stabilized along Kurdish territory, but ISIS remained powerful, capturing the city of Ramadi, four hours south of Kirkuk.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    30/04/2015
    839
    30/04/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kurdish peshmerga forces on the frontline outside of Kirkuk. In the spring of 2015, Kurdish peshmerga, supported by coalition air power, pushed back against the assault of ISIS insurgents, saving the city of Kirkuk and even reclaiming some ISIS-held villages. By May, the front had mostly stabilized along Kurdish territory, but ISIS remained powerful, capturing the city of Ramadi, four hours south of Kirkuk.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    838
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kurdish peshmerga forces on the frontline outside of Kirkuk. In the spring of 2015, Kurdish peshmerga, supported by coalition air power, pushed back against the assault of ISIS insurgents, saving the city of Kirkuk and even reclaiming some ISIS-held villages. By May, the front had mostly stabilized along Kurdish territory, but ISIS remained powerful, capturing the city of Ramadi, four hours south of Kirkuk.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    29/04/2015
    838
    29/04/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kurdish peshmerga forces on the frontline outside of Kirkuk. In the spring of 2015, Kurdish peshmerga, supported by coalition air power, pushed back against the assault of ISIS insurgents, saving the city of Kirkuk and even reclaiming some ISIS-held villages. By May, the front had mostly stabilized along Kurdish territory, but ISIS remained powerful, capturing the city of Ramadi, four hours south of Kirkuk.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    837
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kurdish peshmerga forces on the frontline outside of Kirkuk. In the spring of 2015, Kurdish peshmerga, supported by coalition air power, pushed back against the assault of ISIS insurgents, saving the city of Kirkuk and even reclaiming some ISIS-held villages. By May, the front had mostly stabilized along Kurdish territory, but ISIS remained powerful, capturing the city of Ramadi, four hours south of Kirkuk.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    29/04/2015
    837
    29/04/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kurdish peshmerga forces on the frontline outside of Kirkuk. In the spring of 2015, Kurdish peshmerga, supported by coalition air power, pushed back against the assault of ISIS insurgents, saving the city of Kirkuk and even reclaiming some ISIS-held villages. By May, the front had mostly stabilized along Kurdish territory, but ISIS remained powerful, capturing the city of Ramadi, four hours south of Kirkuk.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    836
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kurdish peshmerga forces on the frontline outside of Kirkuk. In the spring of 2015, Kurdish peshmerga, supported by coalition air power, pushed back against the assault of ISIS insurgents, saving the city of Kirkuk and even reclaiming some ISIS-held villages. By May, the front had mostly stabilized along Kurdish territory, but ISIS remained powerful, capturing the city of Ramadi, four hours south of Kirkuk.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    29/04/2015
    836
    29/04/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kurdish peshmerga forces on the frontline outside of Kirkuk. In the spring of 2015, Kurdish peshmerga, supported by coalition air power, pushed back against the assault of ISIS insurgents, saving the city of Kirkuk and even reclaiming some ISIS-held villages. By May, the front had mostly stabilized along Kurdish territory, but ISIS remained powerful, capturing the city of Ramadi, four hours south of Kirkuk.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    835
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kurdish peshmerga forces on the frontline outside of Kirkuk. In the spring of 2015, Kurdish peshmerga, supported by coalition air power, pushed back against the assault of ISIS insurgents, saving the city of Kirkuk and even reclaiming some ISIS-held villages. By May, the front had mostly stabilized along Kurdish territory, but ISIS remained powerful, capturing the city of Ramadi, four hours south of Kirkuk.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    29/04/2015
    835
    29/04/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Kurdish peshmerga forces on the frontline outside of Kirkuk. In the spring of 2015, Kurdish peshmerga, supported by coalition air power, pushed back against the assault of ISIS insurgents, saving the city of Kirkuk and even reclaiming some ISIS-held villages. By May, the front had mostly stabilized along Kurdish territory, but ISIS remained powerful, capturing the city of Ramadi, four hours south of Kirkuk.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor

     

  • Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    834
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Captured ISIS fighter
    A young ISIS fighter is interrogated for the media by police in Kirkuk. The young man is a Sunni Arab who said he was lured to join ISIS by the group’s social media campaign.
    Gen Sarhad Qader, a police chief in the Iraqi city of Kirkuk.
    A former Kurdish peshmerga guerrilla who spent years fighting Saddam Hussein's forces, Qader got the job in the wake of the US-led invasion of Iraq, and has held it throughout the ensuing years of turmoil.
    Some 245 policemen have been killed under his command, while more than a dozen attempts have been made on his life by bomb, bullet and poison.
    A group of Islamic State-linked terror suspects were arrested with explosives in Kirkuk and are thought to have been planning attacks on civilians.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor
    29/04/2015
    834
    29/04/2015
    Kurdistan : l’autre Irak
    Captured ISIS fighter
    A young ISIS fighter is interrogated for the media by police in Kirkuk. The young man is a Sunni Arab who said he was lured to join ISIS by the group’s social media campaign.
    Gen Sarhad Qader, a police chief in the Iraqi city of Kirkuk.
    A former Kurdish peshmerga guerrilla who spent years fighting Saddam Hussein's forces, Qader got the job in the wake of the US-led invasion of Iraq, and has held it throughout the ensuing years of turmoil.
    Some 245 policemen have been killed under his command, while more than a dozen attempts have been made on his life by bomb, bullet and poison.
    A group of Islamic State-linked terror suspects were arrested with explosives in Kirkuk and are thought to have been planning attacks on civilians.
    © Yuri Kozyrev / Noor